Digital Commonwealth

Card and letter from William Lloyd Garrison, Baltimore Jail, to Francis Todd, May 13, 1830

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Item Information

Title:
Card and letter from William Lloyd Garrison, Baltimore Jail, to Francis Todd, May 13, 1830
Author:
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879
Addressee:
Todd, Francis
Date:
May 13, 1830
Format:
Letters/Correspondence
Manuscripts
Location:
Boston Public Library
Rare Books Department
Collection (local):
Anti-Slavery Collection
Subjects:
Antislavery movements--United States--History--19th century
Abolitionists--United States--19th century--Correspondence
Antislavery movements--United States
Abolitionists--United States--History--19th century
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879
Todd, Francis, 1805-1862
Boston Courier
Extent:
2 leaves (4 p.)
Permalink:
Terms of Use:
No known copyright restrictions.
No known restrictions on use.
Notes (citation):
Merrill, Walter M. Letters of William Lloyd Garrison, v.1, no.34, no.38.
Notes:
Holograph, signed.
On page one of this manuscript, there is an explanation that William Lloyd Garrison was recently convicted of libel in a Baltimore city court and fined $50. Garrison encloses the "annexed card, with a request that it might be inserted in the Courier, and the sonnet which follows, with its prefatory remarks."
Beginning at the bottom of page one through page two, William Lloyd Garrison writes about his condition in the Baltimore prison. Garrison is "as humble as any occupant of a ten-foot building in our great Babel."
On page three, while in the Baltimore prison Garrison writes "a card" or letter to Mr. Francis Todd, a merchant of Newburyport, Mass. This was written for publication in the Courier. William Lloyd Garrison admonishes Francis Todd: "I am ashamed of your conduct. How could you suffer your noble ship to be freighted with the wretched victims of slavery? Is not this horrible traffic offensive to God, and revolting to humanity?"
On page four of this manuscript, there is a letter to the editor of the [Boston] Courier and "Sonnet to Sleep" by William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison explains that he pencilled the sonnet "upon the wall of my room the morning after my incarceration. It is a little bulletin showing in what manner I rested during the preceeding night."
Language:
English
Identifier:
2815974
Call #:
Ms.A.1.2 v.41, p.4B
Barcode:
39999066747286
mq8679599