Digital Commonwealth

Letter from Edmund Quincy, Dedham, [Mass.], to Caroline Weston, July 2'd, 1847

Item Information

Notes:
Holograph, signed.
Edmund Quincy begins this letter with remonstrances regarding Caroline Weston not having written to him. He read William Wells Brown's narrative and found it excellent. Edmund Quincy said: "It is a long time since I have seen a man, white or black, that I have cottoned to so much as I have to Brown, on so short an acquaintance." Edmund Quincy is the sub-editor of the Rev. Charles Spear. He went to a reception for President Polk. Not many people turned out to see him. He describes the meager welcome given the presidential procession. "What do they say in N.B. to the re-affiancing of Anna Motley to Alfred Rodman?" Edmund Quincy says that "Miss Shaw, the daughter of the Chief Justice is engaged to Typee Melville [Herman Melville]." He mentions Deborah Yerrinton's latest literary effort and his own letters. [Deborah Yerrinton is Edmund Quincy's pen name.] He tells of a financial dispute between William Wells Brown and Charles Lenox Remond over the disposition of money collected at Bristol County Anti-Slavery meetings. Edmund Quincy negotiated with Frederick Douglass for a series of letters to be published in the National Anti-Slavery Standard. He thinks Frederick Douglass wanted too much for them. Edmund Quincy discusses a problem connected with Caroline Weston's school in New Bedford.
Language:
English
Identifier:
2808792
Call #:
Ms.A.9.2 v.23, p.32-33
Barcode:
39999066780725
mq8508902